Difference between revisions of "Archive:10-foot user interface"

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[[Image:Screenshot000.png|thumb|300px|right|[[XBMC Media Center]] ([[XBMC#Skins and skinning-engine|PM3.HD skin]]) home screen user interface, showing an example of a 10-foot user interface design]]


In [[computing]] a '''10-foot user interface''' (also sometimes referred to as "'''10-foot UI'''", "'''10-foot interface'''", or "'''10-foot experience'''") is a software [[graphical user interface|GUI (graphical user interface)]] designed for display on a large [[television]] (or similar sized screen) with interaction using a regular television-style [[remote control]].<ref>http://www.crunchgear.com/2010/11/03/eight-reasons-to-get-a-google-tv-and-four-reasons-not-too/ Eight Reasons To Get a Google TV and Four Reasons Not To</ref>
In computing a '''10-foot user interface''' (also sometimes referred to as "'''10-foot UI'''", "'''10-foot interface'''", or "'''10-foot experience'''") is a software GUI (graphical user interface) designed for display on a large television (or similar sized screen) with interaction using a regular television-style remote control.


"10 foot" refers to the fact that the GUI's elements&mdash;i.e. menus, buttons, text [[fonts]], and so on&mdash;are theoretically large enough to read easily at a distance of {{convert|10|ft|0|lk=in}} from the display (which in this context is normally a [[Large-screen television technology|large-screen television]]). To avoid distractions and to be more clear, 10 foot UIs also tend to be very simple and usually only have the minimum core buttons.
"10 foot" refers to the fact that the GUI's elements—i.e. menus, buttons, text fonts, and so on—are theoretically large enough to read easily at a distance of ten feet from the display (which in this context is normally a large-screen television). To avoid distractions and to be more clear, 10 foot UIs also tend to be very simple and usually only have the minimum core buttons.


Typical examples of popular 10-foot user interfaces are [[Home theater PC|HTPC (Home theater PC) media center]] software applications such as [[Google TV]], [[MediaPortal]], [[XBMC]], [[Plex_(software)|Plex]], [[Boxee]], [[Windows Media Center]] and [[Front Row (software)|Front Row / Apple TV]] interfaces, but most other [[Smart TV]] and [[set-top boxes]] devices and software with [[interactive television]] interfaces also belong in this category.<ref>http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/guides/2010/12/htpc-guide-1 Ars Technica HTPC Guide: December 2010</ref>
Typical examples of popular 10-foot user interfaces are HTPC (Home theater PC) media center software applications such as Google TV, MediaPortal, XBMC, Plex, Boxee, Windows Media Center and Front Row / Apple TV interfaces, but most other Smart TV and set-top boxes devices and software with interactive television interfaces also belong in this category.


==Overview==
== Overview ==
[[File:10footUI.png|thumb|300px|right|Common setting for the 10-foot user interface is a home theater or living room with surround sound speaker setup. The distance between viewer and TV varies, but is typically 10-feet with a 32" or larger big-screen television display.]]
"Ten foot" is used to differentiate the GUI style from those used on desktop computer screens, which typically assume the user's eyes are less than two feet (60&nbsp;cm) from the display. The 10-foot GUI is almost always designed to be operated by a hand-held remote control. The 10-foot user interface has extra large buttons with menu fonts that are easily read and navigated.
"Ten foot" is used to differentiate the GUI style from those used on desktop computer screens, which typically assume the user's eyes are less than two feet (60&nbsp;cm) from the display. The 10-foot GUI is almost always designed to be operated by a hand-held remote control. The 10-foot user interface has extra large buttons with menu fonts that are easily read and navigated.


This difference in distance has a huge impact on the interface design compared to typical [[desktop computer]] interaction when the user is sitting at a desk with a [[computer monitor]], and using a [[computer mouse|mouse]] and [[computer keyboard|keyboard]] (or perhaps a [[joystick]] device for [[computer games]]) which is sometimes referred to as a "''[[2-foot user interface]]''".  Ten-foot interfaces may resemble other [[post-WIMP]] systems graphically, due to a similar paucity of pixels, but do not assume the use of a [[touch screen]].
This difference in distance has a huge impact on the interface design compared to typical desktop computer interaction when the user is sitting at a desk with a computer monitor, and using a mouse and keyboard which is sometimes referred to as a "''2-foot user interface''".


==Common design guidelines==
== Common design guidelines ==
Here are a few design guidelines which should be considered when designing a 10-foot user interface compared to a [[2-foot user interface]].
Here are a few design guidelines which should be considered when designing a 10-foot user interface compared to a 2-foot user interface.
* '''Installation''' - The 10-foot experience places the display across the room from the user, and therefore anything that requires the user to physically interact with the interface and forces the user to get up and cross the room should be avoided.
* '''User input and Navigation''' - Support for a standard remote, which is the generally preferred input device for a 10-foot GUI.
* '''User input''' - Support for a standard remote, which is the generally preferred input device for a 10-foot GUI, alternatively if the GUI is for a [[video game console]] then make certain the user can control the menus via the primary game input device.
* '''Display and Design''' - Regardless of the video output device, at a range of 10 feet it is very important that all fonts and UI graphics are large enough for comfortable readability (anti-aliased fonts will generally offer better readability). Check size of all UI elements, avoid single-pixel thick horizontal lines or static UI elements with single-pixel detail as older televisions and low-resolution displays may simply not display such fine detail, and content will flicker if running on an interlaced display mode since a single row of pixels will be visible only half the time.
* '''Display''' - Regardless of what the video output device is, at a range of 10 feet it is very important that all fonts and UI graphics are sized large enough for comfortable readability, (also note that [[anti-aliased]] [[fonts]] will generally offer better readability).
* '''Installation and Miscellaneous''' - The 10-foot experience places the display across the room from the user, and therefore anything that requires the user to physically interact with the interface and forces the user to get up and cross the room should be avoided.
* '''Size of UI elements''' - Avoid single-pixel thick horizontal lines or static UI elements with single-pixel detail as older televisions and low-resolution displays may simply not display such fine detail, and content will flicker if running on an [[interlaced]] display mode since a single row of pixels will be visible only half the time.


==Software and devices==
== Links ==
{{Example farm|date=May 2011}}
* Wikipedia article on 10-foot user interface: [[wikipedia:10-foot user interface]]
Examples of a few common and popular 10-foot user interfaces are:
* Wikipedia article on Human-Machine Interface: [[wikipedia:Human-Machine Interface]]
 
* Wikipedia article on User interface engineering: [[wikipedia:User interface engineering]]
=== Devices ===
* Wikipedia article on User experience design: [[wikipedia:User experience design]]
*[[Apple TV]]
* Wikipedia article on Industrial design: [[wikipedia:Industrial design]]
*[[Boxee Box]]
* Wikipedia article on Interactive television: [[wikipedia:Interactive television]]
*[[BeHooTV]]
* Wikipedia article on Smart TV: [[wikipedia:Smart TV]]
*[[Google TV]]
*[[Hauppauge MediaMVP]]
*[[Kaleidescape]]
*[[Networked Media Tank|Networked Media Tank (including Popcorn Hour and Popbox)]]<ref>{{cite web|title= Popcorn Hour A-100 Review on CNET.co.uk<!-- Bot generated title -->|url=http://reviews.cnet.co.uk/accessories/0,39100116,49297499,00.htm|work=|archiveurl=http://www.webcitation.org/5gKbqUBsj|archivedate=2009-04-26|deadurl=no|accessdate=2009-04-06}}</ref><ref>[http://www.pcworld.com/article/146264/popcorn_hour_a100_media_streamer.html PC World - Popcorn Hour A-100 Review<!-- Bot generated title -->]</ref><ref>[http://macrecon.com/hardware-review-popcorn-hour-nmt-a-100/ MacRecon » Hardware Review :: Popcorn Hour NMT A-100<!-- Bot generated title -->]</ref>
*Niveus Media
*[[Philips NetTV]]
*[[History of video game consoles (seventh generation)|PlayStation 3, Xbox 360 and Wii]] video game console systems
*[[Roku]]
*[[Samsung [email protected]]]
*[[TiVo]]
*Zune HD AV Dock
 
=== Standalone software===
* [[Beyond TV]], (Windows)
* [[Boxee]] (Mac OS X, [[Apple TV]], Linux, Windows)
* [[Dell MediaDirect]] (Windows)
* [[Front Row (software)|Front Row]] (Mac OS X)
* [[GB-PVR]] (Windows)
* [[Media Center (software application)|J. River Media Center]] (Windows)
* [[MediaPortal]] (Windows, free)
* [[MythTV]] (Linux, FreeBSD, Mac OS X)
* [[Plexapp|Plex]] (Mac OS X)
* [[SageTV]] (Windows, Linux and Mac)
* [[Windows Media Center]] (Windows)
* [[XBMC Media Center]] ([[Linux]], [[Mac OS X]], [[Microsoft Windows|Windows]], [[Xbox|Xbox game-console]], free)
 
=== Media center operating systems ===
* [[Element OS]] (Linux)
* [[GeeXboX]] (Linux)
* [[LinuxMCE]] (Linux)
* [[Mac OS X]] (via [[Front Row (software)|Front Row]] that comes with Mac OS X)
* [[Mythbuntu]] (Linux)
* [[Windows XP]] Media Center Editon (Windows)
* [[Windows Vista]] (Windows) (Home Premium and Ultimate [[Windows Vista editions|editions]] only which come with [[Windows Media Center]])
* [[Windows 7]] (Windows) (Home Premium and up only which come with [[Windows Media Center]])
* [[XBMC Live]] (Linux)
 
==See also==
*[[Interactive television]]
*[[Home theater PC]]
*[[Smart TV]]
*[[Comparison of set-top boxes]]
*[[Digital media receiver]]
*[[Home cinema]]
*[[Graphical user interface]]
*[[Wife acceptance factor|Wife Acceptance Factor (WAF)]]
*[[Skin (computing)|Skin]]
*[[User interface engineering]]
*[[Human-Machine Interface]]
*[[Look and feel]]
*[[Object-oriented user interface]]
*[[Organic User Interface]]
*[[Post-WIMP]] and [[WIMP (computing)|WIMP]] (WIMP stands for "window, icon, menu, pointing device")
*[[CE-HTML]]
*[[Usability]]
*[[Ergonomics]]
*[[Context menu]]
 
==References==
{{reflist}}
 
==External links==
*[http://www.pcmag.com/encyclopedia_term/0,2542,t=10-foot+UI&i=36892,00.asp 10-foot user interface definition-PC Magazine]
*[http://encyclopedia2.thefreedictionary.com/10-foot+user+interface "10-foot user interface" definition according to The Free Dictionary by Farlex]
*[http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee418274.aspx Introduction and interface design guidelines to the 10-Foot Experience for Windows Game Developers (by Jon Steed, Software Design Engineer at Microsoft)]
 
{{GUI widgets}}
{{Window managers}}
{{Home theater PC (application software)}}
 
[[Category:Graphical user interfaces]]
[[Category:Software architecture]]

Latest revision as of 20:14, 7 December 2020

In computing a 10-foot user interface (also sometimes referred to as "10-foot UI", "10-foot interface", or "10-foot experience") is a software GUI (graphical user interface) designed for display on a large television (or similar sized screen) with interaction using a regular television-style remote control.

"10 foot" refers to the fact that the GUI's elements—i.e. menus, buttons, text fonts, and so on—are theoretically large enough to read easily at a distance of ten feet from the display (which in this context is normally a large-screen television). To avoid distractions and to be more clear, 10 foot UIs also tend to be very simple and usually only have the minimum core buttons.

Typical examples of popular 10-foot user interfaces are HTPC (Home theater PC) media center software applications such as Google TV, MediaPortal, XBMC, Plex, Boxee, Windows Media Center and Front Row / Apple TV interfaces, but most other Smart TV and set-top boxes devices and software with interactive television interfaces also belong in this category.

1 Overview

Common setting for the 10-foot user interface is a home theater or living room with surround sound speaker setup. The distance between viewer and TV varies, but is typically 10-feet with a 32" or larger big-screen television display.

"Ten foot" is used to differentiate the GUI style from those used on desktop computer screens, which typically assume the user's eyes are less than two feet (60 cm) from the display. The 10-foot GUI is almost always designed to be operated by a hand-held remote control. The 10-foot user interface has extra large buttons with menu fonts that are easily read and navigated.

This difference in distance has a huge impact on the interface design compared to typical desktop computer interaction when the user is sitting at a desk with a computer monitor, and using a mouse and keyboard which is sometimes referred to as a "2-foot user interface".

2 Common design guidelines

Here are a few design guidelines which should be considered when designing a 10-foot user interface compared to a 2-foot user interface.

  • User input and Navigation - Support for a standard remote, which is the generally preferred input device for a 10-foot GUI.
  • Display and Design - Regardless of the video output device, at a range of 10 feet it is very important that all fonts and UI graphics are large enough for comfortable readability (anti-aliased fonts will generally offer better readability). Check size of all UI elements, avoid single-pixel thick horizontal lines or static UI elements with single-pixel detail as older televisions and low-resolution displays may simply not display such fine detail, and content will flicker if running on an interlaced display mode since a single row of pixels will be visible only half the time.
  • Installation and Miscellaneous - The 10-foot experience places the display across the room from the user, and therefore anything that requires the user to physically interact with the interface and forces the user to get up and cross the room should be avoided.

3 Links