Linux

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Kodi for Linux is primarily developed for Ubuntu Linux. Third-party packages for most other Linux distributions are however available, and it is also possible to compile Kodi media center software application from scratch for nearly any Linux distribution. Linux supports full hardware decoding with most graphics cards. Linux is generall the best way to get a fast, free, and "appliance" feel for an Kodi powered HTPC.

Contents

1 Main topics

Other Linux-specific wiki pages for topics, guides, and advice. For everything else, standard Kodi pages will normally apply.

icon HOW-TO:Install Kodi for Linux
icon Linux FAQ
Frequently Asked Questions for XBMC running under Linux-based operating systems.
icon Supported hardware
Kodi needs a 3D capable GPU graphics hardware controller for all rendering. The required 3D GPU chips are common today in most modern computers, and even some set-top boxes. Kodi runs well on what (by Intel ATOM standards) are relatively underpowered OpenGL 1.3 (with GLSL support), OpenGL ES 2.0 or Direct3D (DirectX) 9.0 capable systems that are IA-32/x86, x86-64, or ARM CPU based.

When software decoding of a Full HD 1080p high-definition video is performed by the system CPU, a dual-core 2 GHz or better CPU is required in order to allow for perfectly smooth playback without dropping frames or giving playback a jerky appearance. Kodi can however offload most of the video decoding process onto GPU and VPU hardware that supports one of the following types of hardware-accelerated video decoding: Android StageFright and MediaCodec API, Intel's VAAPI, Nvidia's VDPAU, AMD's XvBA, Microsoft's DXVA, Apple's VDADecoder/VideoToolBox, or OpenMAX. By taking advantage of such hardware-accelerated video decoding, Kodi can run well on many inexpensive and low-power systems which contain a modern GPU and VPU.

icon Developing Kodi for Linux
Team-Kodi (formerly called Team-XBMC) first ported XBMC Media Center software to Linux in 2007, and the whole project cross-platform application was renamed to Kodi in 2014. Kodi itself is a huge open source project and it takes loads of people working together to maintain it for all platforms, that is why Team-Kodi is always on the lookout for C/C++ programmers to volunteer in assisting us with the development of Kodi. Whether you have contributed to the Kodi/XBMC project in the past or not, please consider doing so now.
icon How-to's
icon Tips and tricks
Boost performance, troubleshoot, enhance, and more.
icon Helpful applications
icon Device specific info
icon Supplemental tools
icon Random notes

2 Requirements

CPU x86 or x86-64 processor such as: Intel Pentium 4/ Pentium M, AMD Athlon 64 / Opteron, or newer CPU (that support SSE2, which all CPUs made within the last 10-years does).
  • If your GPU/VPU does not support hardware video decoding then you will require a fast modern processor is required to decode some 1080p videos encoded in H.264, VC-1/WMV9, HEVC/H.265 VP9, etc.. Editor note: Hard to quantify this, but maybe we can get a rough benchmark score in here?
  • There is very limited Power PC (PPC) support: [Linux] How to install on Linux-ppc
RAM
  • Recommended: 1GB or more in a HTPC media player appliance-like computer dedicated for Kodi, and 2GB or more in a computer for multipurpose use.
Graphics

Kodi will run on most graphics cards made within the last 10-years or so, though for good hardware video decoding support a little newer graphics cards can be required. This includes most cards from AMD/ATI, Intel, or NVIDIA which support OpenGL 2.0 or later.

ATI Intel Nvidia
Minimum without HW decoding: ATI Radeon RV710/M92 (HD 4300/4500) Note: These are uvd2.2 cards Intel GMA 950 (945G) Nvidia GeForce 6-Series
Minimum for HW decoding of H.264 and VC-1: AMD/ATI Radeon HD 5000 Series or newer Intel GMA X4500HD (G45) or newer Nvidia GeForce 8-Series or newer
Minimum for HW decoding of HEVC (H.265) and VP9: TBA: AMD Radeon R9 Series? (R9 390?) or newer Intel HD Graphics 5500 or newer Nvidia GeForce 900 series (GM20x) or newer
Video decoding For hardware video decoding, which may be necessary on low-performance CPUs to playback 1080p content, make sure your GPU or VPU supports either VAAPI, VDPAU, or OpenMAX.
Note: Ubuntu 12.10 (or newer) users of ATI graphics cards are recommended to use a UVD 2.2 or higher graphics card for proper hardware video decoding support.
Drive space The Kodi application generally only takes up between 100 to 200 MB of space, depending on how the binary is compiled. Technically speaking, if your hardware supports netbooting, you do not even require a internal storage for either the operating-system or for Kodi.
  • Minimum: 4 to 8GB
  • Recommended: 16GB or more
Depending on how big your video library is. Most of the space required for Kodi comes from the images/artwork cache, which can be adjusted: HOW-TO:Reduce disk space usage.

3 Linux distributions

For install instructions for various Linux distros, see HOW-TO:Install Kodi for Linux.

3.1 x86

3.2 ARM

Raspberry Pi
SolidRun CuBox-i / CuBoxTV
Other

4 How-to's

HOW-TO:Autostart Kodi for Linux
How to automatically start up in Kodi using various Linux distributions.
HOW-TO:Compile Kodi for Debian or Ubuntu
HOW-TO:Compile Kodi for Linux
HOW-TO:Compile Kodi for Linux on Fedora Red Hat Enterprise Linux CentOS
HOW-TO:Compile XBMC for Debian
HOW-TO:Compile XBMC on openSUSE Linux
HOW-TO:Configure your Cyberlink Media Centre Remote on Linux
HOW-TO:Install KodiBuntu from a USB drive
This page explains procedures and methods to create a USB bootable drive or install Kodi into a USB flash drive. The instructions are written for Kodibuntu, but may work for other installs with ISO images.
HOW-TO:Install Kodi for Linux
HOW-TO:Install Kodi on Fedora 21 using RPMFusion packages
This page presents an approach to turning a minimal installation of Fedora 21 into a standalone Kodi installation, with minimal additional software / overhead. The Kodi packages available from RPMFusion are used as the basis for this setup. At the end of this guide you will have a set-top box style of system that, when powered up, will quickly boot and then start Kodi automatically without intervention (e.g. no need to first log in).
HOW-TO:Install XBMC for Linux on Fedora using a Shuttle XS35GTv2
HOW-TO:Keep resolv.conf settings in DHCP after reboot
HOW-TO:Keep resolv.conf settings in STATIC IP after reboot
HOW-TO:Keep static IP
NFS
Network File System, or NFS, is a way to share folders over a network, and was added to XBMC in v11 (Eden). The main benefits of using NFS instead of SMB are its low protocol overhead (which allows it to send data across a network more quickly) and its use of simple UID's to authenticate users rather than username/password combinations. This part bears repeating, as many people are confused on this point and try to create usernames and passwords to get XBMC to work with NFS: NFS does not use usernames or passwords as logins; it uses a UNIX-based "userID" (UID) alone.
HOW-TO:Remap HDMI audio on Gen 1 ION - Linux
HOW-TO:Send xbmc.log to rsyslog
HOW-TO:Set up Lirc
HOW-TO:Set up PS3 BD Remote
HOW-TO:Set up Wake-On-Lan (Ubuntu)
HOW-TO:Suspend and wake in Ubuntu

5 Device specific info

Attention.png NOTICE:
These pages are maintained by the community and should not be considered an endorsement or recommendation. Device pages are made when there's a bunch of useful information for a particular device, and someone takes the time to make that page. Keep in mind, some devices simply don't need a page of specific information, but are still excellent devices.

Do not use this page as a guide for what to buy to run Kodi. Disclaimer


Chromebox
This page is a collection of links, information, tips, and guides related to running Kodi on Chromebox mini PCs. Chromeboxes are a relatively cheap and powerful personal computers pre-installed with Google's Chrome OS operating system that can easily be reinstalled with Linux and run Kodi.
CompuLab Utilite
CuBox
The CuBox is a very small, fan-less nettop-class computer manufactured by the Israeli company SolidRun Ltd. It is cube-shaped at only approximately 2 × 2 × 2 inches and weighs 91 grams (0.2 lb, or 3.2 oz). CuBox is the first commercially available desktop computer based on the Marvell Technology Group's Armada 500-series SoC (System-on-Chip), and said to currently be the worlds smallest complete desktop computer.
EzeeCube
Gigabyte Brix
This page is a collection of links, information, tips, and guides related to running XBMC on the Gigabyte Brix line of mini PCs.
Intel NUC
The Intel NUC is a series of small, awesome, x86-based PCs that works fantastically as an HTPC. Can run a full desktop OS if desired. Reasonable starting price considering size and power. Uses Celeron to Core i5 CPUs. Can run fanless with a replacement heatsink case.
MK808B Plus
MK808B Plus (not to be confused with the very different MK808 or MK808B), is a small ARM-based Android "stick" hardware that uses an Amlogic S805 SoC chipset. MK808B Plus is also able to run Kodi on Linux using unofficial third-party firmware images of example OpenELEC.

While the integrated WiFi support in it is not great, but for about $35 USD, the MK808B Plus is a fairly decent 1080p set-top box device for cheap that can decode all the most popularly used video codecs today, including HEVC (H.265).

ODROID
ODROID-X is a series of powerful ARM-based single-board computers (developer boards), manufactured by Hardkernel Co., Ltd., an open-source hardware company located in South Korea, capable of running Android or Linux. Kodi should work on Hardkernel ODROID-X, X2, U2, U3, XU, XU2, XU3 and XU3 Lite.

The ODROID-X series was primary designed to act as a development platform for developers wanting to prototype embedded systems based on Samsung Exynos 3, 4, and 5 series of System-on-Chips (SoC), but have since also been made popular for multi-purpose use by low-power device enthusiasts and hobbyist alike, including those using it for as HTPC (Home Theater PC) for Kodi.

Raspberry Pi
The Raspberry Pi is an series of ARM powered, credit card sized computer developed in the UK by the Raspberry Pi Foundation for educational and hobbyist purposes. These low power computers is mass produced at very low prices and the high number of units sold gives it massive community support. As an Kodi HTPC, all Raspberry Pis supports full 1080p (Full HD) video playback of the most commonly used codecs, support for most if not all Kodi add-ons, and reasonably responsive GUI performance.
SolidRun CuBox-i
CuBox-i series (which includes CuBoxTV) is SolidRun's second-generation family of multi-purpose ARM-based mini-computers that is capable of running either Kodi on Android or on Linux, both using firmware images provided by SolidRun development team and third-parties of which many comes with Kodi pre-installed.

With its hardware built around SolidRun MicroSOM platform the CuBox-i series uses scalable and open source friendly Freescale i.MX6 family of SoC (System-on-Chip) ranging from a single to quad ARM Cortex-A9 processor cores, 2D/3D hardware graphics processing unit, video decoding and encoding acceleration hardware, and HDMI 1.4 1080p 3D output support.

SolidRun Hummingboard
UDOO
Wandboard
WeTek Play
WeTek Play is an ARM-based media player device that can currently run either Kodi on Android or on Linux, both using official first-party firmware images provided by WeTek development team which comes with Kodi pre-installed. WeTek Play is also one of the first Kodi based set-top box devices that have support for integrated DVB TV-tuners, which are currently fully functional via plug-and-play under Android and Linux in combination with Tvheadend PVR backend or VDR PVR backend and its matching PVR client addon for Kodi.

6 Random notes

Feel free to place various notes, tips, and links here. As this section of the wiki gets more organized, those notes will be properly sorted. Consider this like a dumping ground for when you're not sure where to put something.

  • ?

7 See also


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